Everything You Need to Know About Backpacks

December 7th, 2018 by Editor | Permalink

There are two words that are reason enough why many people such as campers, hikers, and adventurers choose to go with a backpack: hands free.

Even if you’re carrying a month’s worth of luggage, the weight is evenly distributed on your back that you won’t be bothered too much when you’re carrying it. Most backpacks these days are durable and can be easily cleaned when exposed to dirt or mud.

Anatomy of a Backpack

Even though backpacks are quite straightforward, there’s actually a little more to them than what it looks like at first. Here are the specifics that you might need to look into when buying a new one that will last you a long time:

  • Shape/Lay-out– The shape of your backpack will resemble the contents that are supposed to beplaced in the bag. While hiking bags are often round, office backpacks aresquare-shaped to accommodate laptops or folders.  
  • Pockets/Compartments – While external pockets are great for items that you need to take out and put back in when you’re on the go, internal pockets and compartments are for items that may need to be kept safely.
  • Straps – Your backpack’s shoulder straps are what supports and evenly distributes the weight of the bag on your back. However, even if the straps are strong enough, they can still buckle or snap if the bag itself is too heavy.

Types of Backpacks

Different types of backpacks are suited for different purposes, and they are designed and manufactured depending on the surroundings and setting they are supposed to be used in. Here they are for your consideration:

  • Hiking – Hiking bags are specifically built to carry heavy loads over long periods of time, and are designed to resist wear and tear. While they are the most durable, they also appear quite bulky and should
  • BikeBag – Bike bags are designed to be flat in shape with a roll topto keep the contents of your bag dry.
  • Office/Urban/School – These types of backpacks are often square or rectangular in shape in order to accommodate rectangular-shaped objects, such as laptops or books. Some backpacks even have a separate sleeve or compartment for this purpose.
  • Fashion – Backpacks in this category only have a front pocket and a main compartment, and are designed more to look good than to be practical. If you have this type of backpack, try to keep it clean and avoid packing it with heavy things.  

When choosing a backpack, be sure to choose one that’s especially suited for your purpose – for instance, having a hiking backpack in the office will definitely look out of place. Checking on the backpack’s quality and characteristics will help you do this easily. 

5 Quick Emergency Repairs for Your Footwear You Can Do on Your Own

December 7th, 2018 by Editor | Permalink

If you’ve ever been in a situation where your footwear breaks down in the middle of the street, there’s a good chance that the first thing that came to your mind is to buy a new pair.But when your budget is tight and you can’t afford it, emergency repairs are a thing you need to know how to do.

Luckily for you, they don’t have to be so hard. Here are a few emergency repairs that you can do on your own:

  1. Re-attach the heel – While in some cases, it’s completely possible to simply re-insert the heel back in place, there are other cases that your heel breaks off completely from your shoe.

When this happens, try to scrape off as much of the old glue as you can and make the heel surface as rough as you can before applying the new glue.

  • Use super glue tore-attach the sole – Loose soles can happen in shoes all the time, and can be theresult of a lot of factors, including weather and general wear and tear. Whenthis happens, shoe glue is your best friend.

Make sure to buy a shoe glue that’s both waterproof and flexible, and spreading it around the sole before gluing it back in will allow the glue to cover a wider surface area.  

  • Repairing expensive leather – Scuffing or scratching leather is quite painful to witness, especially if the shoes are new. But the good news is you can now conceal the scuffs with the use of special color pens which can work on all types of leather – just make sure you get the right ones.

Alternatively,other things such as petroleum jelly or toothpaste can also do the trick, butthey could be risky as it can depend entirely on the solution. As much aspossible, stick with the leather polish that is specifically designed andformulated for your shoes.

  • Applying adhesive – Holes in your soles may not be fixed by applying a generous amount of shoe glue, but a good amount of adhesive may be able to plug up the holes that may be caused by rough terrain.

When applying adhesive on a hole, it’s important to give it a few moments to become tacky and dry before plugging it with a tab.

  • Replacing aglets – Even the plastic tips on your shoelaces can wear down over time. Fortunately, you can easily solve it with a quick repair by applying glue to the frayed edges and wrapping them with thread. Be sure to tie both ends and leaving them to dry before applying toothpaste to get rid of the grime.

Things to Consider Before Getting Inked

October 19th, 2018 by Editor | Permalink

For a long time tattoos carried a stigma, given their association to unsavory people like gang members and prisoners. However, tattoos aren’t necessarily bad. In fact, they can be a good mark of your personality and taste. But before you decide to get inked, mull over these points first:

1. It will be part of you. Tattoos are for life, so you better be sure that you can live with it. If you feel like you’d be embarrassed to show it to people, then it’s probably not for you.

2. Your pain tolerance. Most people who have had a tattoo say the pain was not as bad as they thought it would be. That said, know that getting ink drilled into your skin will hurt.

3. Your tattoo artist. Check that his tattoo parlour is clean and that it displays the necessary certificates prescribed by the government. During your initial consultation, make sure whether you will actually be comfortable with him modifying your body: the trust between artist and client will largely affect the success of the tattoo.

4. The quality of work. Check your chosen tattoo artist’s portfolio to guarantee that he can superbly bring to life your chosen design. The marks of a good tattoo are clear lines, smooth shading and vibrant colors. Choose a reputable establishment to avoid complications—whether aesthetic or medical—in the future.

5. Your budget. Of course, make sure you can afford your ink. In Singapore, prices usually start at $100, and goes up depending on the size, colors, and complexity of your design. Pricing is subjective so feel free to negotiate, but don’t be niggardly. A 4×4” tattoo should cost about $300 to $400.

6. Meaning of your tattoo. Your tattoo is a tag that you choose for yourself. Don’t choose a design just because you think it looks cute: it should also have a personal significance. The best tattoos have a story behind it.

7. Avoiding stress. Getting repeatedly punctures is not a pleasant experience, but it doesn’t have to be distressful either. If you choose your tattoo artist well, you should be able to relax and talk to him as you get inked. You can take some non-steroidal pain relievers before the session to minimize pain.

8. Touch-ups. When your tattoo has healed, and you find that a little more coloring or adding a few lines or shades could improve it, don’t be afraid to request your tattoo artist for a touch-up. This shouldn’t cost much and could be done easily.

Managing Acid Reflux With Food

October 19th, 2018 by Editor | Permalink

Acid reflux or GERD, one of the most common health problems in Singapore, happens when the acid in the stomach goes back up the esophagus of food pipe, causing a burning or tightening feeling in the chest (called heartburn).

As acid reflux is largely caused by the food we eat, those who experience it should pay close attention to their diet to resolve the condition and avoid further episodes in the future.

Foods That Trigger Acid Reflux
The following food items should be avoided by people who frequently have acid reflux:

• Deep-fried food. The fat contained in these foods causes the lower esophageal sphincter to narrow, leading the stomach acids to back up.
• High-fat meats. Meats like pork, beef and lamb stay longer in the stomach, increasing the chance of acid reflux.
• Caffeine. One cup per day should be no problem, but those who drink coffee throughout the day will very likely increase the acidity in their stomach.
• Tomatoes and citrus fruits. Tomatoes, as well as oranges, lemons, and even pineapple naturally contain high levels of acids.
• Carbonated drinks. The bubbles in soda cause the stomach to expand, which puts pressure on the stomach, thus prompting acid reflux.
Other common trigger food are high-fat dairy products, mint, onions, garlic, alcohol, and chocolate.

Foods That Can Help Acid Reflux
Adding more of the following foods may help you avoid experiencing acid reflux or heartburn:

• Lean meats. Low-fat meats include fish, chicken, turkey and seafood. Don’t fry; instead, bake, poach, broil or grill them.
• Vegetables. With naturally low fat-content, vegetables help decrease acidity in the stomach. The best kinds are cauliflower, asparagus, potatoes, cucumbers and green beans.
• Whole-grain food. Oatmeal contain lots of fiber that absorb the acids in the stomach; whole grain rice and breads are also good options.
• Ginger. The anti-inflammatory properties of ginger helps prevent the onset of heartburn as well as other gastric problems.
• Fruits. Any non-acidic fruit is a great addition to your diet, but the best are probably apples, bananas, melons and pears.
• Unsaturated fats. These can be found in foods like walnuts, sunflower oil, olive oil, sesame oil, avocadoes, and flaxseed.

Making Important Lifestyle Changes
Aside from heartburn, other symptoms of acid reflux are bloating, regurgitation, burping and a dry cough. If you’re frequently bother by acid reflux, remember the last foods you ate and minimize or avoid them in the future. You can also reduce episodes of acid reflux by avoiding the following:

• Overeating,
• Lying down immediately after a meal,
• Eating close to bedtime, and
• Smoking.

The Do’s and Don’ts of Using Essential Oils for Your Body

September 25th, 2018 by Editor | Permalink

Essential oils are taken by distilling plants whose oils can have certain therapeutic properties. The process uses different parts from different kinds of plants, such as roots, leaves, stems, and even the flowers and tree bark.
These oils can either be used by themselves or as a base for a perfume, and are often either topically applied on the skin or inhaled as a fragrance (this makes them widely used for aromatherapy).

When used properly, essential oils are not just relaxing, but also boost your immune system and relieve headaches and stress that comes after a long day’s work, which makes them great to have for your home or office in Singapore.

Do’s
If you know how to use essential oils the right way, they can actually have benefits for you. Here are a few ways that they should be completely okay for you to use:

• Try it if you’re anxious. Even though they won’t take all your stress away, essential oils such as those made from lavender and chamomile can work wonders in helping to keep you calm and relaxed.

• Tell your doctor. As much as possible, your doctor should know if you are using essential oils especially if you happen to be taking medications – essential oils and medications can sometimes cause allergic reactions to occur.

• Toss out old oils. Because of how long they have been exposed to oxygen in the air, essential oils also have a shelf life and you should toss them out if they haven’t been used for more than three years.

Don’ts
There are also ways that don’t allow these essential oils to work their benefits onto your body but instead cause adverse effects, such as the following:

• Rub them anywhere. While you can rub certain oils on your arms and legs, they may not be safe to apply to your eyes, ears, nose, or mouth. Some examples of these include lemon and peppermint oils.

• Trust buzzwords. Certain natural substances can be irritating and cause allergic reactions, even if the label says it’s “pure”. To be safe, test the oil out by applying a small amount onto a small area of your skin to see how your body will respond.

• Use them on injured or inflamed skin. Unwanted skin reactions can happen when you’re not diluting your oils, and this can especially be dangerous on injured or inflamed skin.

But perhaps the most important thing you want to consider when using essential oils is the age – children under the age of 1 and pregnant women may get allergic reactions to certain oils. Before using essential oils at home or in your office, always be sure to consult your doctor.

How to Make Your Own Essential Oils in 5 Simple Steps

September 25th, 2018 by Editor | Permalink

Essential oils have been used for a long time, and if you’ve ever tried to use them at least once, you know that they can be quite expensive, especially if they have certain antibacterial and antiviral properties.

While they are similar to fragrance oils, the difference between the two is that fragrance oils simply imitate the smell, while essential oils are the plant’s essence concentrated and have more benefits.

Fortunately, you don’t always have to spend a lot to get the oils you want. With the right know-how, you can make your own oils for your own use at home anytime, anywhere.

On Choosing Plants
You can use a good number of garden-variety herbs when it comes to making your own essential oil. Some types of plants you can use for making oils include peppermint, rose, and even lemon.

These aromatic oils are made from different plant parts, and the best way to make sure you get as much of the extract that you can is by chopping them. Ideally, you want 3-4 cups of chopped plant materials to get you started.

In addition to the chopped up plants, here are the supplies you need to make your own essential oils:
• Crock pot with a cover
• Water
• Time

The Process of Making Essential Oils
1. Place the chopped-up plant material in the crock pot and add distilled water (it should fill up to ¾ the crock pot. Cover the pot with the lid upside-down and place the crock on the stove.

2. Heat the water on high, and turn it down to low once the water starts to get hot. When the setting is on low, leave the crock to simmer on the low setting for three to four hours.

3. Once the plant material has cooked down after simmering, turn off the heat and let it cool down enough before placing the contents into the refrigerator (you can transfer the plant material and the water if the crock pot doesn’t fit) and leaving it overnight.

4. Take the pot out the next morning and carefully lift the fond. This fond is the oil that you want, and it will melt down quickly if you’re not quick enough. Place this in a properly labeled bottle and seal it.

5. If there is a bit of liquid-based fluid on the bottom, you can heat the oil on a gentle simmer for a short amount of time to allow that liquid to turn to steam and separate. Once it’s separated, store it in a colored glass container in a cold, dark place. Doing this will help to keep the oil in good condition for as long as possible.